Spirometry Test unaffected by Marijuana Use

One of the great concerns by anti marijuana use advocates is that smoking marijuana will affect overall lung health. In the following article Paul Armentanoin sets out the argument that when UCLA lung researcher Don Tashkin MD studied the issue he determined that

The author finds no clear link between marijuana use and the development of COPD or lower respiratory tract infections. In addition, “findings from a limited number of well-designed epidemiological studies do not suggest an increased risk for the development of either lung or upper airway cancer from light or moderate use”

As local governments approve recreational use of marijuana. from the lung function or spirometry angle at least it seems that there is no evidence to support claims that Marijuana use leads to Cancer or COPD.

 

spirometry, lung function test, copd. asthma, smoking cessation tool, www.mdspiro.com
Primary Care Physician Spirometer this MicroLab desktop spirometer with integral printer and color touch screen. Features include 41 test parameters including FEV1, FVC with % predicted, diagnostic interpretation, lung age, choice of predicted normals, child incentives, post bronchodilator comparison and printed report with graphs

 

the article is presented below

 

Previously published by MARIJUANA blog

UCLA’s Dr. Donald P. Tashkin Offers Proof Marijuana Is Not Linked To Abnormalities In Lung Function

by Paul Armentanoin

Don Tashkin MD UCLA
Don Tashkin MD UCLA

A forthcoming review to be published in journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society reiterates that the ingestion of cannabis smoke poses nominal pulmonary risks compared to those associated with tobacco smoke. The author of the paper, Donald P. Tashkin, MD, emeritus professor of medicine and medical director of the Pulmonary Function Laboratory at the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles performed US-government sponsored studies of marijuana and lung function for over 30 years.

A preview of Dr. Tashkin’s forthcoming review appears on the American Thoracic Society news website here. It reads:

Dr. Tashkin found that regular smoking of marijuana by itself causes visible and microscopic injury to the large airways that is consistently associated with an increased likelihood of symptoms of chronic bronchitis that subside after cessation of use. He also found that the evidence does not indicate that habitual use of marijuana leads to significant abnormalities in lung function when assessed either cross-sectionally or longitudinally, except for possible increases in lung volumes and modest increases in airway resistance of unclear clinical significance.

The author finds no clear link between marijuana use and the development of COPD or lower respiratory tract infections. In addition, “findings from a limited number of well-designed epidemiological studies do not suggest an increased risk for the development of either lung or upper airway cancer from light or moderate use, although evidence is mixed concerning possible carcinogenic risks of heavy, long-term use,” Dr. Tashkin notes. “In summary, the accumulated weight of evidence implies far lower risks for pulmonary complications of even regular heavy use of marijuana compared to the grave pulmonary consequences of tobacco.”

The full paper will be available later this month.

In May, presenters at the annual meeting of the American Academy for Cancer Research reported that subjects who regularly inhale cannabis smoke possess no greater risk of lung cancer than do those who consume it occasionally or not at all — according to an analysis of six case-control studies, conducted between 1999 and 2012, involving over 5,000 subjects (2,159 cases and 2,985 controls) from around the world.

Last year, clinical data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reported that subjects’ exposure to moderate levels of cannabis smoke, even over the long-term, is not associated with significant adverse effects on pulmonary function.

Vaporizers, which heat marijuana to a point where cannabinoid vapors form, but below the point of combustion, reduce subjects’ intake of potentially hazardous combustible compounds. In several clinical trials, investigators have concluded that vaporization is a “safe and effective” cannabinoid delivery mode that “does not result in exposure to combustion gases.” Researchers also report that vaporization results in higher plasma concentrations of THC compared to smoked cannabis.

http://mdspiro.com/spirometry

Randy Clare

Randy Clare

Randy Clare brings to The Sleep and Respiratory Scholar more than 25 years of extensive knowledge and experience in the sleep and pulmonary function field. He has held numerous management positions throughout his career and has demonstrated a unique view of the alternate care diagnostic and therapy model. He is considered by many an expert in the use of a Sleep Bruxism Monitor in a dental office. He is also very involved with physician office spirometry for the early detection of COPD and Asthma

Mr. Clare’s extensive sleep industry experience assists Sleep Scholar in providing current, relevant, data-proven information on sleep diagnostics and sleep therapies that are effective for the treatment of sleep disorders.

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