Sleep Bruxism: Are Dentists Harming Patients?

By Vesna S. Sutter, DDS; and Louis Malcmacher, DDS, MAGD Previously appeared in Journal of the Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity Volume 108 • Number 3 | Fall 2015 pg 20-24 Abstract Sleep bruxism (SB) is a known parasomnia in...

Sleep Bruxism & Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a condition that has received an unprecedented level of attention over the past decade. The health implications of OSA are life altering and life threatening. A growing body of research is linking OSA to heart...

Sleep Bruxism and OSA… Dentists Be Aware!

The connection between OSA and Sleep Bruxism is becoming even more clear as the Nox T3, home sleep study device marketed by Carefusion , has become a more common tool in the dental office. As dentists approach sleep apnea dentistry...

Sleep Bruxism Cause and Effect

Sleep Bruxism, a medical term for teeth grinding a parafunctional habit of the jaws, is common among adults who are stressed, have oral problems, or are suffering from OSA or obstructive sleep apnea. Although teeth grinding happens to many people,...

Dr Gordon J Christensen Suggests Testing for Sleep Bruxism

Sleep Scholar has been very interested in the link between OSA and Bruxism (tooth grinding). The link in the literature is clear however the link between the literature and the practicing dentist has a long way to go. I recently...

Is Sleep Bruxism the Dental Sleep Disorder?

As the dental community begins to focus more and more on sleep disordered breathing it is common to overlook sleep bruxism as an indicator of sleep quality. The dental community is extremely adept at treating the often devastating impact of...

Sleep Bruxism

Dentists and patients have been told for years ‘why’ they grind their teeth at night.  I’ve heard from occlusion specialists that sleep bruxism has to be because of imperfections in the bite, from myofacial pain specialists that it’s because of dis-coordination of...

Sleep Bruxism Clinical Decision Matrix based on Objective Evidence

Introduction: There are a number of decisions many clinicians make with regard to patients with craniofacial pain and sleep related issues that could be enhanced and\or supported by objectively measuring the jaw EMG musculature.  It is widely understood these issues...